P.E.I.’s iconic Teacup Rock is gone after post-tropical storm Fiona

PEI’s iconic Teacup Rock is gone after post-tropical storm Fiona walloped the Island for more than 12 hours over the weekend, leaving widespread destruction and tens of thousands without power.

The landmark at Thunder Cove Beach was one of the Island’s most photographed rock formations — and it gained popularity in recent years thanks to social media.

Dale Paynter snapped a photo of what’s left of the rock on Sunday.

Teacup Rock at Thunder Cove Beach was one of the Island’s most photographed rock formations. (Twin Shores Campground Area)

“I can remember the Teacup before it was called ‘the Teacup,'” he told CBC News.

“It was a larger rock with three legs, and before that it was probably attached to the cliff. I was happy to see it spend its final years as a ‘rock star.'”

Marg Chisholm-Ramsay also snapped photos of the void where Teacup Rock used to be on Sunday.

“I’ve seen many great things in my travels: the Great Wall of China … the Great Pyramid of Giza, and the Lion of Lucerne but to me the Thunder Cove Teacup was more magnificent because she formed herself from nature,” she said.

“The Teacup has seen baby announcements, gender reveals, family pictures, marriage proposals and even ashes were spread near the Teacup — all significant life events.

“The Teacup is ours (Islanders), but it meant a lot to others too.”

‘A sad landmark to lose’

Katie McCrossin’s family has cottages on the north shore of PEI with a view of the rock, where her parents confirmed that the rock formation is no longer.

Dale Paynter shared this photo of Teacup Rock in its heyday on the left, and a shot of what’s left of the iconic landmark taken on Sunday. (Submitted by Dale Paynter)

“My parents have confirmed that Teacup Rock was taken by Hurricane Fiona,” she said. “It’s definitely a sad landmark to lose … It’s sad for many. I think there’s been lots of memories made around that rock and around that area of ​​PEI and the beach.”

McCrossin spent her childhood summers on the beach, and says the loss isn’t a surprise for those who live in the area.

“My childhood was playing down there, catching crabs, and swimming on those rocks. And now my three kids were doing the same. It’s been around for generations. But so have other rocks, and they’ve disappeared and new ones have come … The coastline is forever changing,” she said.

‘It’s definitely a sad landmark to lose,’ says Katie McCrossin, who spent childhood summers on the beach. (Jane Robertson/CBC)

“Every year, every fall, we think, ‘Oh it’s gonna be gone this winter.’ I guess it took it a little sooner — you always think it’s gonna be the ice that takes it. But Hurricane Fiona was quite the storm.”

The rock formation gained popularity in recent years thanks to social media. (Laura Meader/CBC)
The destruction of the rock wasn’t a surprise for those who live in the area. (@michael.gallant1/Instagram)

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