News stories from the Star you should know about on November 25, 2022

Good morning. This is the Friday, Nov. 25 edition of First Up, the Star’s daily morning digest. Sign up to get it earlier each day, in your inbox.

Here’s the latest on online gambling in Ontario, iPhone factory workers in China and the Emergencies Act inquiry.

DON’T MISS:

iPhone factory revolt: What’s next after police beat Chinese workers protesting wages and COVID policy?

Video emerged this week showing police in Zhengzhou, China, kicking and clubbing protesting factory workers — shining new light on longstanding labor complaints among the people who build the world’s iPhones. Production has slowed amid recent COVID outbreaks at the Foxconn factory in Zhengzhou, and worker unrest has erupted over pay and risk of infection. The executive director of advocacy group China Labor Watch says workers are suffering from “double exploitation” by their government and international corporations. Jeremy Nuttall and Joanna Chiu break it all down in this explainer.

  • Context: Foxconn also manufactures iPhones in India and Vietnam, but most Apple products are assembled in Chinese factory complexes employing hundreds of thousands of workers, many of whom live in crowded dormitories. In a statement in October, Foxconn said it is using “closed-loop management” in Zhengzhou, meaning employees live in their workplace with no outside contact.
  • More: In the past, Apple has had to step in to meet its corporate responsibility, one expert said. The most notable example was the corporation taking remedial measures after a string of suicides at Foxconn’s Shenzhen factory.

iPhone factory revolt: What’s next after police beat Chinese workers protesting wages and COVID policy?

Video emerged this week showing police in Zhengzhou, China, kicking and clubbing protesting factory workers — shining new light on longstanding labor complaints among the people who build the world’s iPhones. Production has slowed amid recent COVID outbreaks at the Foxconn factory in Zhengzhou, and worker unrest has erupted over pay and risk of infection. The executive director of advocacy group China Labor Watch says workers are suffering from “double exploitation” by their government and international corporations. Jeremy Nuttall and Joanna Chiu break it all down in this explainer.

  • Context: Foxconn also manufactures iPhones in India and Vietnam, but most Apple products are assembled in Chinese factory complexes employing hundreds of thousands of workers, many of whom live in crowded dormitories. In a statement in October, Foxconn said it is using “closed-loop management” in Zhengzhou, meaning employees live in their workplace with no outside contact.
  • More: In the past, Apple has had to step in to meet its corporate responsibility, one expert said. The most notable example was the corporation taking remedial measures after a string of suicides at Foxconn’s Shenzhen factory.

Top Justin Trudeau officials say the Emergencies Act may need an overhaul

Following Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland’s claim that last winter’s blockade of Ottawa and along the border was a grave threat to Canada’s national security because it risked immediate and long-term economic damage, top Trudeau officials say the Emergencies Act may need to be overhauled. They say it should more clearly address “modern threats” that include risks to Canada’s economic security that could also cause physical harm or violence. Tonda MacCharles and Alex Ballingall report on conversations Freeland recalled with American officials about US car plants having to shut down.

  • Wait, what? The government’s claim that economic security threats are covered by the Emergencies Act has been highly contentious throughout the inquiry.
  • More: Officials from the Prime Minister’s Office say former Conservative interim leader Candice Bergen told Justin Trudeau there would be “significant concerns” to consider in meeting with convoy participants, the Emergencies Act inquiry heard Thursday. In a statement to the Star, Bergen said the call went differently.

WHAT ELSE:

Jordan Bitove will take ownership of Torstar, including the Toronto Star.

POV:

Former Toronto Maple Leaf Borje Salming is honored during a pre-game ceremony prior to the game between the Toronto Maple Leafs at the Scotiabank Arena in November.

Borje Salming was the soul of the Leafs. He overcame so much.

CLOSE UP:

A homeless person's tent sits under the Gardiner Expressay.

TORONTO: An unhoused person’s tent sits under the Gardiner Expressway on May, 13, 2020. If you lost your home, could you find shelter? A Star analysis details a system in crisis.

Thank you for reading First Up. You can reach me and the First Up team at firstup@thestar.ca

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